...transitions.
After a while you learn the subtle difference
Between holding a hand and chaining a soul,
And you learn that love doesn’t mean leaning
And company doesn’t mean security,
And you begin to learn that kisses aren’t contracts
And presents aren’t promises,
And you begin to accept your defeats
With your head up and your eyes open
With the grace of a woman, not the grief of a child,
And you learn to build all your roads on today,
Because tomorrow’s ground is too uncertain for plans,
And futures have a way of falling down in mid-flight.
After a while you learn
That even sunshine burns if you get too much.
So you plant your own garden and decorate your own soul,
Instead of waiting for someone to bring you flowers.
And you learn that you really can endure…
That you really are strong,
And you really do have worth.
And you learn and learn…
With every goodbye you learn.
Comes the Dawn (Veronica A Shoftstall)
in-my-mouth:

Simple Spaghetti Fra Diavolo
in-my-mouth:

Open Face Meatball Sandwich
vacants:

(by Brooklyn Arts Council)
mystic-revelations:

Montmartre Paris
By faula thierry

mystic-revelations:

Montmartre Paris

By faula thierry

I think people would be happier if they admitted things more often. In a sense we are all prisoners of some memory, or fear, or disappointment—we are all defined by something we can’t change.
It’s a beautiful theory, but more to the point, it’s how the world is: you and I are collections of, not just particles at particular positions at each instant, but of matrices, walking around, performing measurements, perceiving the world and ourselves. You may not want to be a bunch of matrices; I quite like the idea. But either way we have no choice: if we want to understand the physical world at the deepest level currently known to human beings, it has to be via quantum theory.
David Deutsch (via superfluidity)
awwww-cute:

Dad stop this is serious

awwww-cute:

Dad stop this is serious

I choose to be a healer because I know what it’s like to be hurt.
Rob Hill Sr.  (via ab-sences)
Some people, they can’t just move on, you know, mourn and cry and be done with it. Or at least seem to be. But for me… I don’t know. I didn’t want to fix it, to forget. It wasn’t something that was broken. It’s just…something that happened. And like that hole, I’m just finding ways, every day, of working around it. Respecting and remembering and getting on at the same time.
Sarah Dessen, The Truth About Forever (via observando)
I’m not where I need to be, but thank god I’m not where I used to be.
(via uniscorn)
All these soft, warm nights going to waste when I ought to be lying in your arms under the moon - the dearest arms in all the world - darling arms that I love to feel around me - How much longer - before they’ll be there to stay? When I do get home again, you’ll certainly have a most awful time ever moving me one inch from you.
Zelda Fitzgerald, Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda: The Love Letters of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald (via m-uir)
aseaofquotes:

David Levithan, Every Day

aseaofquotes:

David Levithan, Every Day

Lost opportunities, lost possibilities, feelings we can never get back. That’s part of what it means to be alive. But inside our heads - at least that’s where I imagine it - there’s a little room where we store those memories. A room like the stacks in this library. And to understand the workings of our own heart we have to keep on making new reference cards. We have to dust things off every once in awhile, let in fresh air, change the water in the flower vases. In other words, you’ll live forever in your own private library.
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore (via observando)
pulitzerfieldnotes:

"I lost my husband on a Monday afternoon of April 1994, killed by a group of people that were our neighbors. I started running with my two children towards the West of the country. At each checkpoint, I was raped by soldiers. Now, I live with HIV and must raise my kids alone.” — Martha

Image by Tomaso Clavarino. Rwanda, 2014.
Forthcoming Pulitzer Center-sponsored project “We Are the Past.”

pulitzerfieldnotes:

"I lost my husband on a Monday afternoon of April 1994, killed by a group of people that were our neighbors. I started running with my two children towards the West of the country. At each checkpoint, I was raped by soldiers. Now, I live with HIV and must raise my kids alone.” — Martha

Image by Tomaso Clavarino. Rwanda, 2014.

Forthcoming Pulitzer Center-sponsored project “We Are the Past.”